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Taking the next step: how to transition from walking to running

If you’re a casual walker looking to intensify your exercise, you should give running a try. It can burn more calories, strengthen your heart, and lower your cholesterol levels. Running can also reduce stress levels and lead to developing a healthier lifestyle. Most importantly, running nourishes your mind and soul by helping you clear your head and find peace within yourself. But how do you even begin to transition from walking to running? Our advice below will get you on the right path, the path to completing your first half marathon! This is a journey that will take time. Just remember, you’re not alone on your journey! We’re here to help you transition from walking to running. Here’s an excellent playlist for your journey!

Running gear

Your transition from walking to running may not be as difficult as you think. Make sure you have a pair of comfortable running shoes. You can extend the life of your running shoes (and save money) by only running in them. Proper fitting running shoes can also help prevent painful shin splints. Here are 7 more tips to avoid shin splints and keep your transition from walking to running on track! Wear workout gear that allows you to move freely, is lightweight, and wicks sweat. Keep a water bottle nearby to stay hydrated and replenish lost fluids. We’re fans of nuun hydration and their tablets. It’s easy to carry and help replace lost electrolytes. 

Begin your journey from walking to running

Let’s assume you walk four or five days every week and want to begin running. That’s a great start! Even if you don’t walk that much, the steps below will help you during your transition from walking to running. Pro tip: you can always take breaks in between if you are out of breath or feel exhausted.

Weeks 1-3

Develop an exercise schedule if you don’t currently have one. The goal is to become more comfortable being on your feet for extended periods of time.

  • First week – walk 30 minutes/day for four days
  • Second week – walk 40 minutes/day for four days
  • Third week – walk 50 minutes/day for four days

Weeks 4-6

Now it’s time to crank it up a bit! But don’t get too excited just yet. You want to slowly incorporate jogging into your schedule.

  • Fourth week – 10-minute warm-up walk, alternate 30-second light jog/4-minute walk for 15 minutes, 5-minute cool down walk
  • Fifth week – 10-minute warm-up walk, alternate 1-minute light jog/4-minute walk for 20 minutes, 5-minute cool down walk
  • Sixth week – 10-minute warm-up walk, alternate 2-minute light jog/3-minute walk for 25 minutes, 5-minute cool down walk

Week 7

When you feel comfortable with this routine, increase your jogging intervals and decrease your walking intervals as you see fit. Set a goal for yourself before you begin. Feel free to pick up the pace during your jog if it feels good. If you feel overwhelmed or exhausted, cut back the time.

  • Seventh week – 5-minute warm-up walk, alternate 3-minute jog/2-minute walk for 25 minutes, 5-minute cool down walk

Week 8

If you continue to feel comfortable, extend the duration of your intervals as you see fit. Alternate your jog and walking like previous routines. Continue to set small goals to reach. Feel free to pick up the pace during your jog if it feels good. If you feel overwhelmed or exhausted, cut back the time.

  • Eighth week – 5-minute warm-up walk, alternate 5-minute jog/1-minute walk for 30 minutes, 5-minute cool down walk

You did it!

By now, jogging for longer periods of time should become more and more comfortable. Congratulations, you’ve made the transition from walking to running! Continue to extend your jogging time. Maybe even quicken your stride and break into slow runs. You’ll eventually eliminate the walking portion of your intervals. When you feel comfortable running for 30-40 minutes, it’s time to sign up for your first half marathon! Do you have advice for someone who wants to graduate from walking to running? Let us know in the 3M Half Marathon Facebook Group or on Twitter.

Follow us on Pinterest and discover more ways to organize your running shoes

Sometimes our shoe collection gets out of control. This is especially true when you have specific shoes for specific activities, like wearing your running shoes only when you run. There have been a few times where we couldn’t find the pair we needed. Add in your spouse, maybe kids, or roommates and the shoe pile can grow on its own! We started thinking about ways to organize our shoes and want to share what we’ve discovered with you. We built a Pinterest board with many clever, sleek, and good-looking ideas! Read about four of our favorites below. Follow 3M Half Marathon on Pinterest and decide for yourself when you visit our “Organize Your Running Shoes” board.

Under the bed

Various plastic containers store pairs of shoes under a bed as an example of different ways to organize your running shoes. Click on the image's link to visit 3M Half Marathon's Pinterest page for more ideas.

Unless you already have drawers under your bed, chances are you have unused space. Put this location to work! We pinned several ideas for different ways to organize your running shoes under your bed. Keep your drawer on wheels so it’s easier to pull out and push back in. This is a great option if your shoes are strewn about all over the bedroom.

On the wall

5 pair of running shoes are tucked into a hand-built wooden rack that hangs from the wall. It's an example of different ways to organize your running shoes. Click on the image's link to visit 3M Half Marathon's Pinterest page for more ideas.

Use the vertical space of your walls in your garage, entrance area, or laundry room. Just like the drawer under your bed option, this is a great way to save space. It gets shoes off the ground and prevents them from becoming a tripping hazard. Building a rack or two in your garage is your best bet if your running shoes need to dry off and air out.

In your closet

Stacks of space-saving plastic containers are filled with shoes. It's an example of different ways to organize your running shoes. Click on the image's link to visit 3M Half Marathon's Pinterest page for more ideas.

Do you have a hill of shoes on your closet floor? One of our Pins provides 20 different shoe storage ideas for your closet. Organize your running shoes and get them off the ground. The hang-down design ensures that you can always find the left and right shoes when you need them. This tactic is ideal if you live in an apartment.

DIY rack

Two different DIY racks that provide examples of different ways to organize your running shoes. Click on the image's link to visit 3M Half Marathon's Pinterest page for more ideas.

This might be our favorite because there are so many different ways that the rack can be customized! Let your imagination run wild, unless you buy a rack that comes with instructions. You can build it to your desired height, move it to where you want, and customize its additional functionality. Use the top spot for plants, put key hooks on the side, or add a corkboard so you can pin photos. So many ideas! 

There are so many different ways to organize your running shoes. Our “Organize Your Running Shoes” Pinterest board has something for everyone. We know you’ll find something that fits your just as well as your running shoes! Is there a specific way you currently organize your running shoes? Let us know in the 3M Half Marathon Facebook Group or on Twitter.

You should only log running miles in your running shoes and here’s why

Picking the perfect running shoes can feel overwhelming. Once you find the ideal pair, it could be very tempting to wear them for walking as well. But are they suitable for walking? The short answer is no. It’s important to choose shoes that are made specifically for your primary activity. This means that you should wear your running shoes only when you’re out for a run. Their typical lifespan ranges between 300-500 miles. This advice applies to all runners, especially if you’re training for your first half marathon!

One of the things many people like about running is that it requires minimal equipment. Nevertheless, what you put on your feet is a critical piece of the puzzle. Whatever the cost, you want to extend their life for as long as possible. Here are some reasons why your running shoes should only be worn for running.

Prevent injury

Using running shoes for other activities, especially other sports, may result in an injury like shin splints. Choose the type of shoe that is specifically designed for the sport you are interested in. Keep running shoes just for running. This is true whether you are a beginner or you’re into marathon training. You want your pair to be accustomed to running only. Introducing other activities can make the shoe breakdown faster than desired. Pro tip: further prevent injury when you avoid these 5 training mistakes.

Less cushioning

Running shoes generally have less overall cushioning than walking shoes, especially in the heel. Even though running is a higher impact activity than walking, “your foot is on the ground longer when you walk so the cushion helps to offset that impact over time,” said Emily Splichal, MD, author of “Everyday Is Your Runway: A Shoe Lover’s Guide to Healthy Feet & Legs.” Less cushioning means it could wear out faster if used for more than just running.

Develop wear patterns

Your gait cycle and pronation type lead to the development of wear patterns on the bottom of your shoes. Because walking is biomechanically different from running, each activity will develop different wear patterns. For this reason, if you are wearing the same pair for both walking and running, this may result in multiple wear patterns that can aggravate gait problems. Pro tip: focusing on your stride, cadence, and body composition with these 7 tips can help with wear patterns too.

Save money

A quality pair of new running shoes can be expensive. If you’re committed to logging hundreds of miles you may need a new pair every couple months. Add the daily wear and tear for anything else and you’ll discover that you need to replace them more frequently. To avoid that, you should use a separate, less expensive pair of sneakers for everyday wear.

In conclusion, you should wear your running shoes only for running. Yes, even if they’re really comfortable and you feel fine when you walk in them. By doing this, you will protect what you have spent so much time looking for. You’ll extend their life and reduce the amount of money you spend.

Running tips that can keep you safe now that daylight saving time has ended

If your clocks didn’t do it automatically, then you just made every clock you own “fall back.” Whether you like it or not, daylight saving time has ended and the sun will set much, much earlier than normal. In general, this means colder temperatures and less sunlight. But like they say, the training must go on! If you’re training for 3M Half Marathon or the Ascension Seton Austin Marathon, these 5 running tips will keep you safe now that daylight saving time has ended. If you’re out driving, watch out for runners and cyclists!

Wear reflective clothing/lights

Reflective clothing is a must! In addition to reflective clothing, bright colors work too. Make sure you’re seen by everyone, from drivers to cyclists. Take your safety a step further and add lights. They’re lightweight and can ensure you’re seen from farther away. Depending on your preference, lights can be worn on your shoes, legs, arms, or your head.

Dress in layers

If it’s chilly outside, dressing in layers can help your body maintain its core temperature. This is critical in ensuring you don’t get sick. It also allows you to take off layers if you get too warm and put them back on when you cool down post-run. When dressing in layers, make sure the layer closest to your body has sweat-wicking material.

Adjust your schedule

Whether you like the time change or not, you should adjust your schedule now that daylight saving time has ended. If you can, run when the sun is out, coming up, or going down. This increases the chances that you’re seen by others. You also avoid running during the coldest parts of the day, especially early morning. You should always check the weather before you head out for a run.

Run defensively

Running defensively doesn’t mean you have to run slower. This could mean wearing reflective clothing/lights (like above), avoiding busy roads, or running in areas with high foot traffic. If you do run near busy roads, make sure you run against traffic. Expect the unexpected and briefly slowing down at intersections, parking garage entrances, and apartment/business driveways. As the amount of daylight diminishes, you need to protect yourself from others who aren’t paying attention or might want to cause harm to others.

Tell someone your workout

Before you take off, tell someone (loved one, co-worker, or roommate) your planned route, mileage, and when they can expect you back. Or ask them to run with you! If they don’t, knowing your route and mileage provides an idea of when they can expect you back and where to check should you not come back on time. Turn on the setting that allows someone to know your location, most smartphones have this.

Take your safety into your own hands with our tips. By being proactive, you increase the chances of completing a successful training run. With drivers paying less and less attention, runners need their safety even more seriously. We want you to make it to the 3M Half Marathon start line on January 19th fully healthy! Is there something you do that we didn’t list? Let us know on Facebook and Twitter.

Increase strength and get leaner when you include cross-training this summer with Camp Gladiator

There are some days where it feels like summer is already here. That means the constant heat and humidity is right around the corner! Most runners reduce the number of long runs from their training because of these conditions. As we know (because we’re runners too!), runners want to consistently better. Add Camp Gladiator workouts to your running schedule and include cross-training to your summer workouts. The benefits will be numerous when fall arrives. Check out the following 8 reasons you should include their 4-week training cycles.

CG trainers cheer on runners at the 2019 3M Half Marathon. Expand your summer training with Camp Gladiator trainers!

Expand your summer training with Camp Gladiator trainers!

Don’t forget! The Camp Gladiator crew warmed you up before the 2019 3M Half Marathon and cheered for you as you charged to the finish line.

Camp Gladiator Benefits

  • 4-week training cycle provides variety and proper progression to keep your body able to do what you love
  • Increase and maintain strength in your upper body, lower body, and core
  • Full-body workouts make you a more well-rounded athlete
  • Improve posture and strength for your long races and those final miles
  • Train in ALL planes of motion, not just the repetitive linear motion (like swimming, biking, running)
  • Reduced chance of injury by training different muscles and foundational movement patterns
  • Build speed and endurance with the training volume and intensity provided at camp
  • Increased agility, balance, and coordination will help you move better and more efficiently

Visit Camp Gladiator to get started and find an Austin location near you! Not in Austin? Find a workout near you.